Polygon Lights

Updated on

August 7, 2020

The idea behind the Polygon Lights came about in 2016, when James Vanderpant was in his final year at the University of Brighton. Polygon was born out of a desire to combat the over-illumination of commercial spaces with a creative, modular system that would provide the end user with as much (or little) light as they desire.

Fast forward to today, and Polygon lights has successfully turned itself into a small operation based out of New York City.


About the design

Polygon lights stand out to me because of their unique identifying characteristics. The shape is the first thing that comes to mind, not just because of it's simplicity, but because of its modularity. You can attach the polygon lights in a pattern of your choosing, as small or as large as your space requires.

The Polygon Lights are touch sensitive, so a simple tap on each tile will turn them on and off. Not only is this a simple way to use the product, it allows you to customize the amount of lighting in the room by only turning on a select few lights.

The bundles range from a 5 light starter pack, all the way up to 25 tile packs. I've seen people use these all grouped together like you would expect, but you can also arrange them in distinct patterns to bring attention to other objects.

How to install Polygon Lights

There a few ways to install Polygon lights, depending on how permament you want them in your home. The first option is to fix each tile to the wall using nails, and the anchor holes behind each.

If you want to opt for a more renter-friendly option, you can also use sticky pads on each tile.

Once you've got your first tile on the wall, the rest all connect using tabs on each side.

The last step is to connect the power source to one of the tiles (the rest will automatically draw power if they are properly connected).

An abundance of copycats

As with most popular designs, the team behind Polygon has been plagued with cheap knockoffs trying to pretend they are the real deal. Looking back—I first discovered this product on Instagram, but it wasn't from Polygon, it was through a sponsored post for a stolen alternative that even went has far as using Polygons marketing materials. James talked about this in a bit more detail in this video.

Design ideas

Looking for some interesting ways you can display Polygon Lights in your home? Here are some creative layout examples ranging from their starter pack of 5, all the way up to 35+

FAQ

Where do they ship?

Polygon is currently shipping worldwide

What is the power consumption per module

The power consumption per module is 0.7W.

What is the color temperature of the light?

3200k

How many modules can be attached to one power supply?

A maximum of 65 tiles

What are the dimensions of each module?

155mm corner to corner

What is the length of the cable?

2 meters

Do they come in RBG?

No

Are they app connected / smart enabled?

No

Final thoughts

I'm a huge fan of modular designs (String shelving is one of my favorite things I own), and it seems to be a rare thing to find in the lighting industry done well.  That what I think draws so many people to engage with the lights when they see them for the first time online, they just feel...different than everything else out there.

Smart, yet playful. Beautiful, yet functional.

Where to buy Polygon Lights

If you're looking for the authentic Polygon Lights and accessories, the best place is from them directly. If you're looking to save 10% on your purchase, feel free to use the promo minimalgoods.

Purchase

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